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CBD and Paleo/Keto Diets: Research and What You Should Know

August 31, 2022 5 min read

CBD and Paleo/Keto Diets: Research and What You Should Know

CBD and Paleo/Keto Diets: Research and What You Should Know

CBD (cannabidiol) is one of the compounds of cannabinoids extracted from cannabis plants like marijuana. Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), a compound of cannabinoids in marijuana, is the one that causes intoxication. CBD does not cause intoxication. It has no psychoactive effects.

There is a lot of scattered information about diets, just as there is a lot of scattered information about CBD. And the two have often been discussed – since CBD, also known as cannabidiol, tends to have a positive impact on the way the body works by helping to regulate mood and appetite, it can be a helpful supplement to keep us on track. Healthy eating habits. As it happens, mood and appetite are imperative for nutrition and diet. Appetite seems obvious enough –people should find supplements that complement our eating habits and allow us to feel balanced, full, and energized without unhealthy appetite suppression or increased metabolism to the point where we compensate by binge eating. A regular dosage of CBD allows us to keep our appetite stable - its purpose is to modulate, regulate, and promote balance. This sense of balance tends to flow into our moods. The federal government considers marijuana-derived CBD illegal. However, enforcement is patchy at best when in practice. The legal status of CBD depends on whether your particular state has legalized the recreational and medicinal use of marijuana and whether the CBD in question is extracted from marijuana or industrial hemp. All information about CBD is widely spread online.

What Is CBD?

This chemical compound is obtained from the hemp plant, marijuana, and cannabis plant. There are over 100 such compounds collectively known to be cannabinoids. Unlike THC, it does not cause a psychoactive effect. The CBD product has grown widely after the pass of the Farm Bill of 2018; it was legalized at some federal levels. 0.3% of THC was allowed. Manufacturers have taken advantage of their benefit to incorporate some in the product they manufacture, like; vapes, gummies, edibles, capsules, and pills.

CBD oil is found in the cannabis Sativa plant, marijuana. Unlike tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), another cannabinoid compound found in the cannabis plant, CBD is not psychologically effective.

Is CBD Safe?

According to Hazekamp (2018), CBD is the safest compared to many other well-known psychiatric drugs.

The CBD market is barely regulated, becoming the main challenge for the interested majority. Therefore, finding the product with the advertised amount of CBD is a big challenge. According to Gurley et al. (2020), commercial CBD products available do not contain the amount of CBD advertised on the label. The study above also suggested that only 30% of CBD products were accurate, 26% had less, and 43% contained more than they claimed on the label.

Those considering trying CBD  need to consider the following: be confident that they are getting the ingredients claimed on the label when buying supplements.

Does CBD Work?

Krcevski‐Skvarc et al. (2018) stated that CBD is approved in Canada to work well for treating pain from multiple sclerosis. The FDA, based on evidence, has approved an oral formulation of CBD as a treatment for drug-resistant in children.

Pain

Soliman et al. (2021) looked at CBD for pain in humans, particularly chronic pain. The study above found evidence of benefit for a large number of sclerosis pain and spasticity. Go et al. (2020) found the benefits of CBD for cancer especially. For instance, Baron (2015) combined tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), and CBD spray was safe and effective even in patients who didn't respond to other pain relievers.     The study above discovered that Allodynia is a problem where a person strangely feels pain from things that should not hurt or are not supposed to hurt.

Sleep

According to Oh et al. (2019), CBD is found to restore altered sleep patterns instead of disrupting an individual's standard sleep patterns.

Mental health

Undoubtedly, our Paleo ancestors must have been in peak physical condition. But just as significantly, their nervous system has been refined to handle stress very well. Although people don't have to fear running from saber-toothed tigers these days, stress levels are through the roof, and people face many health problems. The Paleo diet requires eliminating foods that trigger or exacerbate stress and anxiety. This includes foods that can worsen psychiatric symptoms of autoimmune diseases such as celiac disease. Although the paleo diet can help improve mental health, the fact is that the modern age presents challenges that can make it difficult to de-stress. When you need a little help relaxing, CBD can be the solution. Many CBD users report reduced stress and anxiety, and promising evidence points to CBD as a therapeutic tool for anxiety disorders.

CBD and Paleo or Keto

Of all the studies, not even one examined the combination of CBD oil and diet, but the potential anti-inflammatory impacts complement a paleo-style approach to health.

Farinon et al. (2020) suggested that CBD oil is controlled for fat quality. This goes double for any CBD candy, cookies, drinks, and other edibles. The study above suggested that it is amicable with a paleo diet and lifestyle. The question is whether it's right for people and whether they have a clear reason for taking it, as with any supplement. The Paleo Approach is not about supplementing a bad diet, but a few carefully selected supplements to complement a basic diet full of nutrient-dense foods play a role.

Conclusion

All the studies on CBD ultimately suggest that the major risk of using CBD may not be the CBD itself. Still, the probability of getting a contaminated supplement, or rather a supplement that its ingredients do not merge exactly a claim on the label. This is a risk in that one can take more or less than it should. Also, there is an issue of legal status, which is implausibly enigmatic and confusing in most places.

References

Baron, E. P. (2015). Comprehensive Review Of Medicinal Marijuana, Cannabinoids, And Therapeutic Implications In Medicine And Headache: What A Long Strange Trip It's Been…. Headache: The Journal Of Head And Face Pain, 55(6), 885-916.

Farinon, B., Molinari, R., Costantini, L., & Merendino, N. (2020). The Seed Of Industrial Hemp (Cannabis Sativa L.): Nutritional Quality And Potential Functionality For Human Health And Nutrition. Nutrients, 12(7), 1935.

Go, Y. Y., Kim, S. R., Kim, D. Y., Chae, S. W., & Song, J. J. (2020). Cannabidiol Enhances Cytotoxicity Of Anti-Cancer Drugs In Human Head And Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma. Scientific Reports, 10(1), 1-11.

Gurley, B. J., Murphy, T. P., Gul, W., Walker, L. A., & Elsohly, M. (2020). Content Versus Label Claims In Cannabidiol (CBD)-Containing Products Obtained From Commercial Outlets In The State Of Mississippi. Journal Of Dietary Supplements, 17(5), 599-607.

Hazekamp, A. (2018). The Trouble With CBD Oil. Medical Cannabis And Cannabinoids, 1(1), 65-72.

Krcevski‐Skvarc, N., Wells, C., & Häuser, W. (2018). Availability And Approval Of Cannabis‐Based Medicines For Chronic Pain Management And Palliative/Supportive Care In Europe: A Survey Of The Status In The Chapters Of The European Pain Federation. European Journal Of Pain, 22(3), 440-454.

Oh, J., Eser, R. A., Ehrenberg, A. J., Morales, D., Petersen, C., Kudlacek, J., ... & Grinberg, L. T. (2019). Profound Degeneration Of Wake-Promoting Neurons In Alzheimer's Disease. Alzheimer's & Dementia, 15(10), 1253-1263.

Soliman, N., Haroutounian, S., Hohmann, A. G., Krane, E., Liao, J., Macleod, M., ... & Rice, A. S. (2021). Systematic Review And Meta-Analysis Of Cannabinoids, Cannabis-Based Medicines, And Endocannabinoid System Modulators Tested For Antinociceptive Effects In Animal Models Of Injury-Related Or Pathological Persistent Pain. Pain, 162(1), S26.