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CBD for Anxiety

September 27, 2022 5 min read

CBD for Anxiety

CBD for Anxiety

Most people currently suffer from anxiety, stress, and depression. While conventional medicine works, it has its fair share of side effects. This article explains how CBD works for anxiety, the required dosage, whether CBD may reduce high blood pressure, the legality of CBD for stress, side effects, how to choose CBD for anxiety, and the pros and cons of CBD.

Cannabidiol, or CBD, is one of the several substances discovered in cannabis plants, including marijuana and hemp. Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), another compound in these plants and the one that gives marijuana its characteristic "high," is also present within those plants. Most CBD products, although not all, are made from hemp plants. Hemp typically contains less THC than marijuana plants, which may contain significantly higher amounts. CBD has recently been promoted as a therapy for several illnesses, such as chronic pain, depression, anxiety, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and cancer. The FDA has authorized Epidiolex to treat Dravet syndrome and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, which cause severe forms of epilepsy. It also approved the drug to address epilepsy brought on by the TB sclerosis syndrome.

How CBD Works for Anxiety

The human body contains a wide variety of sensors. The cells have molecular compounds called receptors comprised of proteins. According to de Almeida & Devi (2020), CB1 and CB2 receptors are believed to cooperate with CBD. The peripheral and central nervous systems contain the majority of such receptors. It is unclear exactly how CBD impacts CB1 receptors in the brain. It might, though, change serotonin impulses.

A chemical called serotonin is crucial to your mental wellness. Individuals who are depressed frequently have lower levels of serotonin. In some situations, anxiety can also be brought on by a serotonin deficiency. According to Mead et al. (2013), a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), including fluoxetine and sertraline, is the standard of care for reduced serotonin. SSRIs can only be obtained with a medication. Rather than taking an SSRI, some persons with anxiety may well be capable of managing their illness with CBD. You should see the doctor whenever you make any modifications to the medication regimen.

Dosage for CBD for Anxiety

There is no precise CBD dosage for anxiety. Researchers have discovered that dosages between three hundred and six hundred milligrams help persons with social anxiety disorders feel less anxious. However, further investigation is required to establish a safe dosage. There are lots of types and products that CBD exists in when it pertains to dosage, which includes: gummies, vapes, topicals, tincture drops, capsules, and oils. Regrettably, there is no standardized identification system or mark of certification you may check for to ensure that these items are healthy since they are not FDA-monitored. States may keep an eye on them, but the policy body is fragmented and has never really managed to keep up with CBD's popularization.

Can CBD for Anxiety Make One High?

Users should not experience a 'high' sensation if the CBD is genuine. Both THC and CBD influence the very same brain receptors. According to Iseger & Bossong (2015), THC is expected to have a considerably higher impact on these receptors than CBD, resulting in altered perception and thinking connected to marijuana. CBD does not seem to be habit-forming or lead to reliance on abuse-related medicines. Nevertheless, some CBD products—whether they explicitly mention it or not—contain THC. If the CBD contains adequate THC, there is a possibility that you will feel euphoric.

Is CBD for Anxiety Legal?

The legal standing of CBD is continually developing. Federal law makes it permissible to extract CBD from hemp plants with less than 0.3% THC. However, it's prohibited to extract CBD from marijuana plants. This is because cultivating marijuana plants is not permitted by Federal law. Additionally, particular criteria must be fulfilled during CBD production. For instance, the grower must have a license and adhere to federal and state laws. States have enacted CBD products to various extents, although some still limit their development, sale, and possession. It is best to research local legal requirements. However, it's important to note that CBD products aren't subject to FDA regulation. As a result, individuals cannot be sure they are receiving what is stated on the labeling.

Side Effects of CBD for Anxiety

According to Millar et al. (2019), some people reported side effects of using CBD for anxiety, such as diarrhea, insomnia, decreased appetite, fatigue, and drowsiness. Epidiolex causes some liver damage to several individuals going under medical trials. Additionally, CBD can interfere with warfarin, a drug that assists in preventing blood clotting. It can also interfere with other medication drugs like calcium channel blockers, antipsychotics, opioids, antihistamines, benzodiazepines, heart rhythm medications, and antidepressants. Women who are breastfeeding or pregnant should not consume CBD to be on the safe side.

How to Choose CBD for Anxiety

When selecting a CBD oil for anxiety, there are several choices available. Individuals should look for an item that has undergone intensive independent third-party testing. The Certificate of Analysis (CoA) will be used to publish the test findings. Verify that the package satisfies the claimed amounts of CBD and THC by comparing the CoA to the package insert.

Additionally, users must ensure that there aren't any harmful pollutants like heavy metals, pesticides, and molds. Even after discovering several high-quality items, making a decision truly boils down to your preferences and requirements. A CBD product incorporating relaxing elements can be helpful if anxiety keeps you awake at night. However, if the anxiety symptoms worsen when you're out and about, perhaps you might choose a low-dose CBD supplement that you can consume everywhere you go and adjust as necessary.

Pros and Cons of CBD for Anxiety

Pros

  • According to Moltke e al. (2021), CBD is useful for alleviating anxiety and stress.
  • In general, using it is simple.
  • CBD can lessen anxiety-related actual discomfort.

Cons

  • The FDA has not authorized any CBD products to reduce anxiety.
  • Certain CBD products include THC, which might make people feel more anxious.
  • There is no precise CBD dosage since everyone has a unique biochemistry.

Conclusion

CBD is an organic compound extracted from hemp. It alleviates anxiety and stress and helps to reduce muscle pain and inflammation due to its analgesic properties. Individuals should raise their CBD dose gradually until they get the desired result. The ailment individuals are addressing, body chemistry, body weight, and the amount of CBD are just a few variables affecting their appropriate CBD dose. Individuals should always consult the doctor when purchasing any CBD product. While purchasing CBD, it is important to read customer reviews. Furthermore, ensure the product has undergone intensive independent third-party testing and that the certificate of Analysis is genuine and concisely detailed.

References

de Almeida, D. L., & Devi, L. A. (2020). Diversity of molecular targets and signaling pathways for CBD. Pharmacology research & perspectives, 8(6), e00682.

Iseger, T. A., & Bossong, M. G. (2015). A systematic review of the antipsychotic properties of cannabidiol in humans. Schizophrenia Research, 162(1-3), 153-161.

Mead, G. E., Hsieh, C. F., Lee, R., Kutlubaev, M., Claxton, A., Hankey, G. J., & Hackett, M. (2013). Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors for stroke recovery: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Stroke, 44(3), 844-850.

Millar, S. A., Stone, N. L., Bellman, Z. D., Yates, A. S., England, T. J., & O'Sullivan, S. E. (2019). A systematic review of cannabidiol dosing in clinical populations. British journal of clinical pharmacology, 85(9), 1888-1900.

Moltke, J., & Hindocha, C. (2021). Reasons for cannabidiol use: a cross-sectional study of CBD users, focusing on self-perceived stress, anxiety, and sleep problems. Journal of cannabis research, 3(1), 1-12.