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Does CBG Help with Stomach Inflammation?

September 15, 2022 6 min read

Does CBG Help with Stomach Inflammation?

Does CBG Help with Stomach Inflammation?

If you have been undergoing digestive complications recently, it may be caused by inflammation. Inflammation infections aren't easy to treat with opioid drugs. This article discusses CBG and its potential benefits in treating stomach inflammation.

If you are a health enthusiast, you might have heard of CBG and its potential benefits. CBG is a new cannabinoid in the market, and its therapeutic benefits are neck to neck with those of CBD. For this reason, CBG gas attracted attention worldwide, although it is only found in small amounts. It doesn't have intoxicating effects like THC. Moreover, it does not have severe side effects even after overdosing. The side effects will only be experienced when you overdose. This article explores the anti-inflammatory and pain-relieving properties of CBG in relieving stomach inflammation. This condition can be hectic, making the victim experience severe pain and discomfort.

What Is Stomach Inflammation?

You must understand this health condition to get it easy on how CBG works to curb it. Stomach inflammation is also referred to as gastritis. It is an inflammatory condition that leads to erosion and irritation of the stomach lining. The condition can be acute or chronic, depending on the degree of infection. Stomach inflammation is mainly caused by irritation due to chronic vomiting, heavy liquor, stress, and anti-inflammatory drugs or other medications. The flowing conditions may also cause it.

  • Helicobacter pylori is an infectious bacteria found in the stomach's mucous lining. If it is not eliminated, it leads to other conditions such as ulcers and stomach cancer.
  • Bile flux – Yabluchansky et al. (2015) noted that the backflow of bile from the bile tract to the stomach might irritate the liver, gallbladder, and related stomach lining.
  • Bacterial or viral infections.

If this condition is left unattended for a long time, it leads to severe blood loss and escalation to stomach cancer.   

Symptoms of Stomach Inflammation

The symptoms may vary depending on the affected individual. Some people experience no symptoms and only notice after it's too late. Common symptoms that may show include:

  • Chronic vomiting
  • Indigestion
  • Loss of appetite
  • Severe or mild abdominal pain
  • Nausea
  • Upset stomach
  • Abdominal bloating
  • Hiccups
  • Burning gnawing feeling in the stomach at night.

Diagnosis of Stomach Inflammation

Diagnosis in the hospital is made based on the individual's family and personal medical background. The doctor may then conduct a physical examination the recommend the following test before treatment:

Blood Tests

Several blood tests are conducted. Red blood cells check is done to determine if you are anemic. Screening for helicobacter pylori infection can also be done.

Upper Endoscopy

A thin tube with a small camera is inserted into your stomach through the mouth to examine the condition. The physician checks the stomach inflammation and person a biopsy for further analysis.

Fecal Occult Blood Test

It is also known as a stool test. It is done to check for blood in the stool, a possible sign of stomach inflammation.

Possible Treatment

Treating stomach inflammation may involve the following

  • Taking over-the-counter drugs and antacids to neutralize stomach acid
  • Eliminating irritating food and spices from dies such as wheat, or dairy
  • Use of acid-blocking drugs for stomach inflammation caused by helicobacter pylori
  • Avoiding hot and spicy food to eliminate erosion of the stomach liming

However, these treatment methods are not guaranteed. They may fail to curb the root cause of stomach inflammation. Moreover, they may contain severe side effects like opioid drugs. In such cases, most people will dive into cannabinoids – cannabigerol – for safe treatment.

What is CBG?

CBG is a cannabinoid coming from the hemp family. It interacts with the body's endocannabinoid system, thus leading to a balanced state where the body functions optimally. CBG has the same molecular weight and molecular mass but a different chemical structure. Therefore, most of the benefits of CBG are similar to those of CBD, but the action mechanism is different. CBG can be used to make many products featuring numerous therapeutic benefits. They include:

What Are Some Benefits of CBG?

CBG is proven to have numerous therapeutic benefits. They include:

CBG for Stomach Inflammation

CBG used for stomach inflammation is based on its potent anti-inflammatory and pain-relieving properties. Kogan et al. (2021) proved that it could be used for treating stomach disorders such as inflammation. The working mechanism of CBG is different from that of THC and CBD in relieving stomach inflammation.

Studies on the inflammatory effects of CBG involved animal and human patients. Brierley (2016) also showed that CBD improves various digestive aspects, such as improving appetite that may be lost due to stomach inflammation. When taking CBG, it interreacts with the endocannabinoid system. De Petrocellis et al. (2012) suggested that this causes it to activate the α2-adrenoreceptor and bind to the TRPV1 and TRPV2 receptors, thus blocking the channels of neurotransmission. This blocks the signaling from the brain associated with stomach inflammation.

The main function of the immune system and inflammatory abilities is to prevent attacks from foreign substances in the body. When the minus system is compromised, the body becomes vulnerable to attacks from autoimmune infections and pathological conditions that may cause stomach inflammation and other severe health conditions. Using western drugs to cure these conditions is no longer feasible as many people are becoming resistant to these drugs. Moreover, Wehling (2014) noted that the drugs cause severe side effects like addiction, depression, and anxiety.

The Bottom Line

Stomach inflammation is also referred to as gastritis. It is an inflammatory condition that leads to erosion and irritation of the stomach lining. The condition can be acute or chronic, depending on the degree of infection. CBG is a new cannabinoid in the markets, and its therapeutic benefits are neck to neck with those of CBD. For this reason, CBG gas attracted attention worldwide, although it is only found in small amounts. The interesting part is that it doesn't have intoxicating effects like THC. moreover, it does not have severe side effects even after overdosing. The side effects will only be experienced when you overdose. This article explores the anti-inflammatory and pain-relieving properties of CBG in relieving stomach inflammation. This condition can be hectic, making the victim experience severe pain and discomfort.

References

Borrelli, Francesca, Ines Fasolino, Barbara Romano, Raffaele Capasso, Francesco Maiello, Diana Coppola, Pierangelo Orlando et al. "Beneficial effect of the non-psychotropic plant cannabinoid cannabigerol on experimental inflammatory bowel disease." Biochemical pharmacology 85, no. 9 (2013): 1306-1316.

Brierley, D. I., Samuels, J., Duncan, M., Whalley, B. J., & Williams, C. M. (2016). Cannabigerol is a novel, well-tolerated appetite stimulant in pre-satiated rats. Psychopharmacology, 233(19), 3603-3613.

De Petrocellis, L., Orlando, P., Moriello, A. S., Aviello, G., Stott, C., Izzo, A. A., & Di Marzo, V. (2012). Cannabinoid actions at TRPV channels: effects on TRPV3 and TRPV4 and their potential relevance to gastrointestinal inflammation. Acta physiologica, 204(2), 255-266.

Kogan, N. M., Lavi, Y., Topping, L. M., Williams, R. O., McCann, F. E., Yekhtin, Z., ... & Mechoulam, R. (2021). Novel CBG derivatives can reduce inflammation, pain, and obesity. Molecules, 26(18), 5601.

McDonnell, M., Harris, R. J., Borca, F., Mills, T., Downey, L., Dharmasiri, S., ... & Gwiggner, M. (2020). High incidence of glucocorticoid-induced hyperglycaemia in inflammatory bowel disease: metabolic and clinical predictors identified by machine learning. BMJ open gastroenterology, 7(1), e000532.

Nenke, M. A., J. G. Lewis, W. Rankin, and D. J. Torpy. "Evidence of reduced CBG cleavage in abdominal obesity: a potential factor in the development of the metabolic syndrome." Hormone and Metabolic Research 48, no. 08 (2016): 523-528.

Pagano, Ester, Fabio A. Iannotti, Fabiana Piscitelli, Barbara Romano, Giuseppe Lucariello, Tommaso Venneri, Vincenzo Di Marzo, Angelo A. Izzo, and Francesca Borrelli. "Efficacy of combined therapy with fish oil and phytocannabinoids in murine intestinal inflammation." Phytotherapy Research 35, no. 1 (2021): 517-529.

Paton, A. J., Mwanyambo, M., Govaerts, R. H., Smitha, K., Suddee, S., Phillipson, P. B., ... & Culham, A. (2019). Nomenclatural changes in Coleus and Plectranthus (Lamiaceae): a tale of more than two genera. PhytoKeys, 129, 1.

Wehling, M. (2014). Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use in chronic pain conditions with special emphasis on the elderly and patients with relevant comorbidities: management and mitigation of risks and adverse effects. European journal of clinical pharmacology, 70(10), 1159-1172.

Yabluchansky, M., Bogun, L., Martymianova, L., Bychkova, O., Lysenko, N., & Makienko, N. (2015). Signs and Symptoms of Gastrointestinal Tract Disorders.