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How Long Does It Take for CBG to Get out of Your System?

September 15, 2022 5 min read

How Long Does It Take for CBG to Get out of Your System?

How Long Does It Take for CBG to Get out of Your System?

Have you been taking CBG lately and wondered how long it would take for the chemical compound to be flushed out of your body? This article explains how long it takes for this cannabinoid (CBG) to be flushed out of the system.

The time it takes before CBG is flushed out of the system depends on the dosage intensity. For example, taking high CBG doses means its concentration in the bloodstream increases; thus, flushing it out will take longer. Many factors determine how long this cannabinoid stays in the system, and one will go through them later in the text. Additionally, the amount of CBG in the bloodstream depends on the dosage methods. For example, taking CBD in tinctures means a lot of it will be described in the bloodstream, raising the concentration. That will bring the body a long time to flush it out. It's not easy to tell how long it will take the body to flush the CBG out of the system if the method of ingestion is topical.

What is CBG

CBG, also known as cannabigerol, is a natural chemical compound in hemp or cannabis. The combination is mainly referred to as the mother of all cannabinoids because the production points start with CBGA – the acidic form of CBG. The concentration of CBG is higher in early flowering hemp as it is near maturity. When the plant matures, the CBG disintegrates to form CBC, CBD, and THC, among other cannabinoids.

Since most hemp or cannabis plants are harvested at maturity, the concertation of CBG found is low – less than five percent. Therefore, CBG is under the radar of scarce and minor cannabinoids.

Why Is CBG Gaining Popularity?

Breuner et al. (2013) explained that the endocannabinoid system controls all body processes to maintain homeostasis. When one takes CBG, it strengthens the endocannabinoid system, thus improving overall well-being. The effects you experience depend on the level of cannabinoids you take.

Some studies link CBG to numerous health benefits like relieving inflammation and gut infection, improving appetite, regulating memory perception, and treating other psychoactive effects. Although studies on the medicinal benefits of CBG are minimal, it shows promising potential for the claimed benefits. Therefore, many people have been taking CBG for these purposes; hence it's natural to want to know how long it takes to be flushed off the system.

CBG Dosage

Martis et al. (2018) explained that, although the popularity of CBG has been rising recently, it’s unfortunate that there is no standard dosage procedure for the compound. Dosage of CBG depends on effects such as cannabis experience, underlying health conditions, baseline health, and age. An individual is supposed to determine the ideal dosage by themselves. The best advice is to start with low doses and then graduate higher. All CBG products have labels on the milligrams or the amount of CBG available. If their package doesn't have this information, check on the website for the lab results, especially if one has shopped online. Introducing one's body to bits of CBG until one is used to it helps avoid severe side effects.

How Long Does It Take for CBG to Be Flushed out of the System?

After taking CBG, it will build up in the body. Regardless of why one takes CBG, one may wonder how long it takes to stay in your system, especially if you took it once. The clinical effects will last several days before the system flushes it out. CBG might remain in the body for five days if taken by standard measures. The following are some of the factors affecting how long it takes for CBG to be flushed out of the system:

Brand of CBG product

Taking CBG products with high CBG content means it will take a long to be flushed out compared to taking brands with low CBG content. Brands with high CBG contents increase the buildup of the contents; hence the body takes a long to flush it out.

Dosage or Administration  

Schoech et al. (2013) explained that the dosage method determines how much CBG gets into the bloodstream. For example, using tinctures means a higher percentage of the chemical compound is absorbed in the bloodstream, thereby raising its concentration. It will take longer to flush it out than other methods such as topical; application.

Frequency of Taking CBG

The time it takes for the body to flush out CBG may also depend on the cannabis experience. If one takes it once, the concentration and the body's knowledge to ward it is low; hence it will flush it out after the medicinal impact is achieved. However, if one has been using CBG for a long, the body tends to develop tolerance towards it. Williamson et al. (2000) explained that the body continues operating normally even without flushing the CBG out; hence expect it to take a long time after withdrawing. Moreover, using CBG for a prolonged increases the concentration buildup in the body; therefore, it takes a long time to get it out.

Metabolism

Metabolism differs from person to person. Therefore, the time it takes for CBG to be flushed out of the system depends on a person’s metabolic process. Typically, CBG might take one or two days in the system when taken in low doses. The time begins to vary as the dosage and concentration of CBG in the body increases.

Conclusion

There is no definite time to define how long the system takes to flush out CBG. The time it takes before CBG is flushed out of your system depends on the intensity of the dosage. For example, taking high CBG doses means its concentration in the bloodstream increases; thus, flushing it out will take longer. Many factors determine how long this cannabinoid stays in the system, and will go through them later in the text. Additionally, the amount of CBG in your bloodstream depends on the dosage methods. For example, taking CBD in tinctures means a lot of it will be described in the bloodstream, raising the concentration.

References

Breuner, C. W., Delehanty, B., & Boonstra, R. (2013). Evaluating stress in natural populations of vertebrates: total CORT is not good enough. Functional Ecology, 27(1), 24-36.

Martis, R., Brown, J., McAra-Couper, J., & Crowther, C. A. (2018). Enablers and barriers for women with gestational diabetes mellitus to achieve optimal glycaemic control–a qualitative study using the theoretical domains framework. BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 18(1), 1-22.

Schoech, Stephan J., L. Michael Romero, Ignacio T. Moore, and Frances Bonier. "Constraints, concerns and considerations about the necessity of estimating free glucocorticoid concentrations for field endocrine studies." Functional Ecology 27, no. 5 (2013): 1100-1106.

 Williamson, Elizabeth M., and Fred J. Evans. "Cannabinoids in clinical practice." Drugs 60, no. 6 (2000): 1303-1314.