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How Soon Should I Feel CBD After Taking It?

August 31, 2022 6 min read

How Soon Should I Feel CBD After Taking It?

How Soon Should I Feel CBD After Taking It?

CBD has found its way into people's lifestyles. Some infuse it in foods and drinks, while others are applying to the skin or take it orally. However, the question asked by the majority is how long it will take to feel the effects of CBD after consumption. The article explains the title by highlighting what CBD is and how CBD interacts with the Body. Further explores factors affecting the time taken to feel the effects of CBD, such as the method of consumption, CBD dosage, frequency of use, and body chemistry.

CBD products are the top trending ingredients on the market recently. Few drops of CBD oil in one's daily meals or directly on the tongue can result in various health benefits such as relieving pain, inflammations, stress, anxiety, seizure, and many more. Most asked question by users in CBD regime is how long it will take to feel CBD effects after consumption. It turns out that CBD is not one size fits all. It depends on various reasons for how long you can harness its benefits after consumption. Such factors include your doses, the form, and where you got your CBD form.

What is CBD?

First and foremost, you need to know what this healthy compound is. Johnson et al. (2010) stated that CBD is an active compound derived from the leaves and flowers of the cannabis plant, especially the high concentrated hemp plant. Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is another famous compound associated with cannabis but is largely known for its psychoactive properties since it causes a feeling of highness in its users. CBD is an exception; it is known for its anti-inflammatory and anti-depressant properties without necessarily portraying a feeling of highness. It is also used in treating pain and anxiety without causing dependency to patients like other medications. All these facts increase its momentum in the health field, and many patients, including health providers, now wish to learn more about the compound.

How CBD Interacts with the Body

Before knowing how long CBD takes for its power to take, you need to understand how it reacts with the Body and brain. Roser et al. (2010) explained that CBD interacts with most body proteins and the central nervous system upon ingestion or any intake method. All this interaction occurs in the endocannabinoid system (ECS), which is responsible for tackling internal body imbalances such as pain, inflammation, stress, anxiety, sleep, stomach ache, etc. It interacts with the ECS receptors CB1 & CB2 by increasing production and reducing the absorption of body cannabinoids which binds with receptors to tackle the current imbalance. For example, when it is introduced to ECS, it reduces the absorption of anandamide (endocannabinoid type), which is the response to tackling pain.

CBD also interacts with other receptors, which help tackle stress. CBD interaction with this protein receptor increases the production of the stress-reliving hormone serotonin, which reduces how the brain perceives stress after consumption of CBD one may take around 2 to 3 hours for these effects to take place depending on the intake method, body chemistry, frequency of use, and dosage.

Method of Consumption

The technique of consuming CBD plays a critical role in the period required to feel the effects of CBD. There are different ways to take CBD, and each method differs with the form of CBD in the market. Each method influences the onset time:

Ingestion

The most common method of CBD intake involves administering a few drops of CBD oil directly into the mouth. Though, it takes time for effects to occur since the compound passes through the digestive tract to the liver, where it is broken down before being absorbed into the bloodstream. The CBD forms ingested include:

CBD Capsules, Soft Gels

Like other tablets of medication form, once swallowed, it takes time to be absorbed into the Body. It can take 1 to 2 hours to feel the effects.

CBD Edibles

Foods and drinks- involve infusing CBD into your daily meals. The effects of taking CBD with foods and drinks can come after 2-3 hours.

Sublingual

Millar et al. (2020) explained that sublingual involves using tinctures and droppers to place a few drops of CBD oil under the tongue, rub it into one's mouth tissue with their tongue, and hold it for one minute before swallowing. Allowing the mucous membranes in the mouth to absorb the compound directly into the bloodstream can feel in 2-5 minutes.

Inhalation

It involves smoking high CBD strain or taking it from a vape pen. It is an efficient and effective method of taking CBD since it makes one easily avoid the earthy grassy oil flavor associated with cannabis, and CBD compounds are easily and quickly absorbed in the Body. The cannabinoids go directly to a person's lungs, where they are absorbed into the bloodstream and circulated all over the Body. It takes approximately only 3 minutes to feel the effects.

Applying to the Skin

CBD topical such as lotion, balms, body scrub, cream, and salve is applied directly to the skin. It is a common method of relieving muscle and joint pain, often administered in specific areas. Once applied, CBD is absorbed through the skin's surface and slowly interacts with the skin cannabinoid receptors. It may take around 90 to 120 minutes for the effects to kick.

CBD Dosage and Frequency of Use

Dosage is important in treating various diseases and impacts how long CBD takes to show its effects. High dosage results from the high concentration of CBD; thus, less time will take for effect to show. Same time, the frequency of use also alters the time since the more a person uses, the more the Body responds faster to the supplement resulting in less time to feel the effects.

Body Chemistry

Romero-Zerbo et al. (2020) said that People have different body structure functions depending on their weight and metabolism. Therefore, the time for the effects of CBD to take place differs from each factor;

Body Weight

Fat affects the quantity of CBD doses needed to feel an effect; hence it can control the time also. The larger the body weight due to fat more CBD is required to feel the effect. Therefore, if people with different mass take the same dosage, the one with high mass will take longer to feel the effects.

Metabolism

The metabolic rate of an individual also interferes with the period of CBD effects. For ingestion, consumed CBD products pass through the liver for breakdown. Therefore the Body's metabolic rate determines the time needed to degrade and synthesize the CBD composition. It affects how long the person processes the cannabinoids and the time taken to feel the effects.

Conclusion

CBD has skyrocketed in peoples' lives as they put the compound in their morning tea, dishes, and even a cocktail. However, the knowledge about how it works and its time effects takes and last has accelerated at snail's speed. One of the many questions about CBD is how long it takes to work. Mostly it lasts an average period of 2 hours but some in even 2 minutes, depending on the consumption method. Other factors that alter the period of effects are the body weight and metabolic rate of an individual, plus how frequent and dosage of CBD a person takes.

References

Johnson, J. R., Burnell-Nugent, M., Lossignol, D., Ganae-Motan, E. D., Potts, R., & Fallon, M. T. (2010). Multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study of THC's efficacy, safety, and tolerability: CBD extract and THC extract in patients with intractable cancer-related pain. Journal of pain and symptom management, 39(2), 167-179.

Millar, S. A., Maguire, R. F., Yates, A. S., & O’Sullivan, S. E. (2020). Towards better delivery of cannabidiol (CBD). Pharmaceuticals, 13(9), 219.

Romero-Zerbo, S. Y., García-Fernández, M., Espinosa-Jiménez, V., Pozo-Morales, M., Escamilla-Sánchez, A., Sánchez-Salido, L., ... & Bermúdez-Silva, F. J. (2020). The atypical cannabinoid Abn-CBD reduces inflammation and protects liver, pancreas, and adipose tissue in a mouse model of prediabetes and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Frontiers in Endocrinology, 11, 103.

Roser, P., Vollenweider, F. X., & Kawohl, W. (2010). Potential antipsychotic properties of central cannabinoid (CB1) receptor antagonists. The World Journal of Biological Psychiatry, 11(2-2), 208-219.