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What Are Terpenes in Broad Spectrum Hemp Extract

September 01, 2022 5 min read

What Are Terpenes in Broad Spectrum Hemp Extract

What Are Terpenes in Broad Spectrum Hemp Extract

Terpenes are the chemicals in cannabis responsible for its distinctive aroma. Few people understand that neither THC, CBD, nor any other cannabinoid has any discernible odor. Therefore, whatever terpenes are present are responsible for the aroma. This article explains what terpenes are in broad spectrum hemp extract.

Cannabinoids, found in the hemp plant, are often considered its most valuable component. But cannabinoids aren't the only crucial components in cannabis; terpenes are another example. Terpenes aren't something only found in marijuana. In reality, these chemicals are ubiquitous in plant life. One of the most common types of CBD is called "broad-spectrum" (CBD). Cannabidiol (CBD) isolate and full-spectrum CBD are the other two. The term "broad-spectrum" refers to the fact that CBD oil contains several other cannabinoids than CBD but no tetrahydrocannabinol (THC).

What Is Broad Spectrum CBD

Products labeled as "broad spectrum" have everything found in hemp except for the psychoactive compound THC. These items are like broad-spectrum CBD, which includes all cannabinoids except THC. People choose broad spectrum CBD because it ensures one gets all the advantages of the plant, rather than the isolated compounds preferred by traditional pharmaceutical companies in medicine development. The CBD product also contains other cannabinoids and terpenes when one uses the entire plant. Since CBD is only one of many cannabinoids in marijuana and hemp, it's essential to make this distinction. Nahler et al. (2019) explained that the medicinal benefits of CBD in its broad range are enhanced by the synergistic effects of the other plant components, and they achieve what is known as the "entourage effect."

What Are Terpenes

According to Cox-Georgian et al. (2019), terpenes are an extensive group of chemical substances produced by various plants, including hemp. Terpenes in the hemp plant not only contribute to its distinctive aroma and flavor but also play a role in establishing the potential health benefits of hemp extracts. The cannabis plant produces a variety of volatile hydrocarbon molecules, which are terpenes. According to Agatonovic-Kustrin et al. (2020), Aromatic terpenes are responsible for cannabis's signature scent and have been used for centuries in aromatherapy. Since the FDA has given terpenes the all-clear, they can be found in all foods and beauty items.

Types of Terpenes

Pinene

Pine needles, sage, and several citrus fruits all contain pinene, as its name suggests. Aromas can range from harsh to pleasant. Pinene help enhance focus and memory recall in aromatherapy. It has anti-inflammatory and antibacterial properties, which can be helpful in therapy.

Linalool

One of the terpenes in CBD, linalool, has a soft and floral scent. Lavender, rosewood, and birch are all plants that contain this component. Linalool's pleasant aroma is why many companies include it in their cosmetics and other topical preparations. Linalool is used in aromatherapy for its sedative and anti-anxiety properties, making it a popular element in sleep aids and relaxation products. It's also helpful in dealing with anxiety, despair, discomfort, and fits.

Ocimene

Ocimene is a terpene that gives some cannabis strains distinctively sweet, herbaceous, and sometimes even lemony or woodsy flavor profiles. It has the potential to provide several therapeutic benefits, including mood enhancement.

Limonene

As its name suggests, limonene is also a form of terpene. Terpenes like this can be found in citrus fruits and have a distinctly lemony scent. One of the terpenes in CBD has been shown to improve mood and reduce stress. It is commonly accepted that it has antifungal and anti-inflammatory qualities, among other therapeutic applications. Anxiety, sadness, and GERD may all benefit from using it. The role that limonene plays in CBD is when things get fascinating. Because it speeds up the assimilation of other terpenes, it is a crucial component.

Caryophyllene

Cloves, cinnamon, and black pepper are all rich sources of the chemical caryophyllene, and the scent reminds one of pepper, wood, or spices. Caryophyllene is a terpene found in CBD, which makes the compound special because it has no discernible physiological effects. It has shown promise in combating sleeplessness, muscle aches, and discomfort. Differentiating it from other terpenes is the possibility that, like cannabinoids, it can react with the cannabinoid receptors.

Eucalyptol

The monoterpenoid eucalyptol is a bicyclic ether-based liquid that has no discernible hue. The aroma of eucalyptus is similar to that of mint, and the flavor is warm and spicy. Unlike water, organic solvents can dissolve it. Eucalyptol accounts for the vast majority of eucalyptus oil.

Humulene

The earthy, woodsy aroma of humulene is reminiscent of hops and coriander, two additional typical terpenes found in CBD. This terpene has anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and appetite-suppressing properties.

Myrcene

Myrcene, a terpene found in CBD, is frequently mentioned while discussing cannabis. People familiar with cannabis will recognize its musky, aromatic, and herbal scent. Myrcene, the tiniest of the terpenes, has profound physiological implications. It makes people feel fatigued, which induces a sluggish, sleepy sensation. Mango, thyme, and bay leave contain it in addition to hemp and cannabis. Myrcene has the potential to alleviate inflammation, disinfect the skin, and kill bacteria and fungi.

Benefits of broad-spectrum

  • Compared to CBD isolate, which only includes pure CBD, broad-spectrum CBD products may have more potent benefits due to the presence of other chemicals that complement CBD.
  • The absence of THC in most cases means that the "high" sensation associated with using CBD oil won't occur when using a broad-spectrum product.
  • Because of the entourage effect, broad-spectrum CBD products may offer similar health advantages to full-spectrum CBD.
  • According to Cather & Cather (2020), antibacterial, anticonvulsant, and anti-inflammatory properties are possible benefits attributed to broad-spectrum CBD.

Cons of broad-spectrum CBD

  • Because it does not contain any THC, broad-spectrum CBD could have some possible drawbacks. Because of this, likely, it doesn't offer as many advantages as full-spectrum CBD does.
  • In addition, individuals who use CBD products risk producing a positive result for cannabinoids when they are subjected to a drug test. There is a possibility that broad-spectrum CBD contains minute levels of THC, which these tests may detect.

Conclusion

Terpenes are just as crucial as cannabinoids in cannabis. Cannabinoids are exclusive to cannabis and hemp plants; thus, it's no surprise they get so much attention. However, cannabinoids wouldn't be nearly as effective or tasty without terpenes. Terpenes, with their medicinal effects and individual fragrances, have several applications in aromatherapy. For CBD to be considered a "broad spectrum," it must retain all of the plant's natural terpenes and cannabinoids. And this affects how the body absorbs CBD.

References

Agatonovic-Kustrin, S., Kustrin, E., Gegechkori, V., & Morton, D. (2020). Anxiolytic Terpenoids and Aromatherapy for Anxiety and Depression. Advances In Experimental Medicine And Biology, 283-296. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-42667-5_11

Cather, J., & Cather, J. (2020). Cannabidiol primer for healthcare professionals. Baylor UniversityMedicalCenterProceedings33(3),376-379. https://doi.org/10.1080/08998280.2020.1775437

Cox-Georgian, D., Ramadoss, N., Dona, C., & Basu, C. (2019). Therapeutic and Medicinal Uses of Terpenes. Medicinal Plants, 333-359. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-31269-5_15

Nahler, G., Jones, T. M., & Russo, E. B. (2019). Cannabidiol and contributions of major hemp phytocompounds to the “entourage effect”; possible mechanisms. J. Altern. Complementary Integr. Med5.