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Which Are the Best CBD Oil Strengths

August 12, 2022 5 min read

WHICH ARE THE BEST CBD OIL STRENGTHS

Which Are the Best CBD Oil Strengths

What is CBD Oil? which is the best CBD oil strength that an individual needs to consume? What are some aspects that one needs to consider when it comes to CBD oil potency? This article explains the best CBD oil strength for an individual to consume.

CBD potency refers to how strong CBD is. People want to buy CBD oil, but they are confused about which is the best CBD oil strength. There are different potencies which include 300 mg, 600 mg, and 4000 mg. There are many CBD options to choose from. Many people are on the website curious to know different potencies. The labels on the packaging do not give clear information about CBD oil's strengths.

After the passing of the 2018 Farm bill, CBD became legal at the federal level in the US. However, the law mandated states to come up with CBD laws. As a result, CBD is legal in some states and illegal in others. Also, the state laws vary, and the legal potencies and THC levels. In addition, the Food and Drug Administration, FDA, does not regulate CBD farming, production, or consumption. Therefore, there is no specific dose or potency for a product to be legal. Although there is no regulation on the right potency level, all CBD products must have a potency variance of less than 10%. So, what are the common potencies, why are there different potencies, and how do you calculate the strength of CBD oil? This article highlights all you need to know about CBD oil's strengths.

Common Strengths/ Potencies of CBD Oil

The label on the package lists in milligrams is the dose contained in the bottle. The potencies also rely on the size of the bottle. Individuals should know that the smaller the bottle, the greater the potency and vice versa.

Why Are There Different CBD Potencies?

There are many different CBD potencies. Rasmussen et al. (2021) explained that the most commonly known potencies are three; 300mg, 600mg, and 1000mg are the commonly sold CBD potencies. These potencies may be in 15ml, 30ml, 50ml, or 60ml packages. Still, there are other potencies which include 2000mg and 4000mg. Different factors determine the best CBD potency. People with varying experiences, body metabolisms, age, weight, and health conditions require different potency levels. For instance, a beginner requires a lower CBD strength than an advanced user. Consumers using CBD oil for chronic pain require a higher CBD potency, while one battling acute pain requires a lower CBD strength.

How to Calculate the Strength of CBD Oil 

Goodman et al. (2019) explained that it is important to consider the size of the bottle when buying CBD oil. As earlier stated, individuals should know that the larger the bottle, the lower the potency. Consider having two bottles containing 600mg CBD oil in a 15ml bottle and another 600mg CBD oil in a 30ml bottle. The 30ml bottle will be half potent as the 15ml bottle. It is very simple to calculate the strength of CBD oil. It is how the calculation goes.

Strength in mg/ml= [Amount of CBD in mg] / [size of bottle in ml]

  • The strength below 5ml/mg or below 10% is considered to be low strength
  • The strength between 15 and 30ml/mg or between 15% and 30% is medium strength
  • The strength between 30 and 60ml/mg or between 30% and 60% is high strength
  • The strength above 60% is considered ultra-high strength or concentrated

Low Potency CBD Oil (10% or less)

Most of the low potency CBD oil is in a 30ml bottle and contains 300mg. Freeman et al. (2020) explained that people who are allergic to CBD and other cannabinoids are advised to use low potency CBD oil. They are useful in mild headaches, body aches and pain, mild to moderate stress, anxiety, and periodic insomnia. According to Scassellati et al. (2020), low potency CBD is significant for beginners whereby it boosts health immune, improves homeostasis, and improves the range of nervous and endocrine conditions. If you notice that low potency CBD oil is not giving you correct results, upgrade to a stronger potency.

Medium Potency CBD Oil (15-30% CBD)

It is the best potency after low potency. People who get little or no benefits in low potency are advised to try medium potency CBD oil. Fenske et al. (2021) stated that people with the following symptoms use it; mild to moderate headaches, mild to moderate anxiety, mild to moderate pain, insomnia, digestive issues, and chronic inflammation. Instead of taking larger or multiple doses of 300mg or 30ml version, upgrade to a stronger potency.

High Potency CBD Oil (30-60% CBD)

Bridgeman & Abazia (2017) stated that high potency CBD oil is used to treat specific medical conditions such as; chronic inflammation, moderate-severe pain, severe insomnia, cancer, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, and moderate-severe anxiety, and frequent migraine headaches. It means that high potency CBD oil is not for everyone. If you get little or no solution after using this potency, upgrade to a stronger potency.

Ultra-high Potency CBD Oil (above 60%) 

Most of the ultra-high potency CBD oil comes as 2000mg of CBD in a 30ml bottle which yields 66% CBD per ml. The product is highly concentrated in CBD and thus, appears to be thick and syrupy. It is manufactured by extraction and made concentrated by removing other elements. This potency is used for serious medical conditions, not for mild or moderate levels of discomfort. However, it is not advised to use this potency if you are a first-time user of CBD oil. Ultra-high potency CBD oil is mostly packer in syringes since it is thick.

Conclusion 

Individuals should not use this article for clinical claims or medical recommendations since the FDA does not approve CBD. Consequently, the rates mentioned above potency are not exact measures that the users should be sure of. As earlier said, there is no exact amount of CBD a user can take at a time. For instance, one must consider experience level, age, sex, body weight, and metabolism to determine the best CBD oil potency. 

References.

Bridgeman, M. B., & Abazia, D. T. (2017). Medicinal cannabis: history, pharmacology, and implications for the acute care setting. Pharmacy and Therapeutics42(3), 180.

Fenske, J. N., Berland, D. W., Chandran, S., Van Harrison, R., Schneiderhan, J., Hilliard, P. E., ... & Rew, K. T. (2021). Pain Management.

Freeman, T. P., Hindocha, C., Baio, G., Shaban, N. D., Thomas, E. M., Astbury, D., ... & Curran, H. V. (2020). Cannabidiol for the treatment of cannabis use disorder: a phase 2a, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, adaptive Bayesian trial. The Lancet Psychiatry7(10), 865-874.

Goodman, S., Leos-Toro, C., & Hammond, D. (2019). Methods to assess cannabis consumption in population surveys: Results of cognitive interviewing. Qualitative health research29(10), 1474-1482.

Rasmussen, J. Ø., Jennum, P., Linnet, K., Glenthøj, B. Y., & Baandrup, L. (2021). Cannabidiol versus risperidone for treating recent-onset psychosis with comorbid cannabis use: study protocol for randomized controlled trials. BMC psychiatry21(1), 1-11.

Scassellati, C., Galoforo, A. C., Esposito, C., Ciani, M., Ricevuti, G., & Bonvicini, C. (2021). Promising intervention approaches to potentially resolve neuroinflammation and steroid hormone alterations in Alzheimer's disease and its neuropsychiatric symptoms. Aging and Disease12(5), 1337.